Trump fuels Texas and California feud. The two biggest states are trading punches again.

Trump fuels Texas and California feud. The two biggest states are trading punches again.

By DAVID SIDERS

LOS ANGELES — California and Texas are at war, and Donald Trump is one of the reasons why.

Trading broadsides on everything from tax and climate policy to a California ban on state-sponsored travel to the Lone Star State, the two poles of American politics have in recent days revived a feud that lay dormant since Texas’ former California-baiting governor, Rick Perry, left the statehouse in 2015.

Its revival is a product of California’s prominent proselytizing as a counterpoint to the Trump agenda — and of a Republican presidency that has forced Texas conservatives to look beyond the White House for a foil.

“Texas is an easy punching bag for liberals. California is an easy punching bag for conservatives,” said Kevin Shuvalov, a Houston-based strategist who served as George W. Bush’s regional political director in 2000.

Placing a telephone call across state lines this week, he sighed, “How are things inside California’s Berlin Wall?”

The renewed animus between the nation’s first- and second-most populous states picked up last week in Texas, when state Attorney General Ken Paxton lit into California’s insurance commissioner for requiring insurance companies to disclose investments in fossil fuels.

Two days later, Paxton’s counterpart in California added Texas and three other states to its list of places to which California prohibits state-sponsored travel. Lawmakers in Austin floated the possibility of retaliating with a ban of their own, and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott met California with a sneer.

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