GOP candidate for Texas governor touts her appeal to women, Latinos, blacks

GOP candidate for Texas governor touts her appeal to women, Latinos, blacks
Lisa Fritsch campaign
Lisa Fritsch says she can broaden the base of the GOP party in Texas.
Wayne Slater

AUSTIN — Lisa Fritsch wants to save the Republican Party.

Texas might be the reddest big state in the country, a place where the GOP has grown over two decades to hold every statewide office, both chambers of the Legislature and a majority of the state’s congressional delegation. But Fritsch sees storm clouds ahead.

“We are not speaking to the five demographics of people who are growing and vote and want their voice heard: women, single mothers, Latinos, blacks and young voters,” she says. “That is where this party loses.”

Fritsch, who is running for governor, is a former radio talk show host, author and occasional talking head on Fox News.

She is black, female and conservative — an outspoken Republican who says she was attracted to the GOP’s policies as the “best way to lift people out of dependency.”

More than anyone else in the race, Fritsch reflects the debate within the Texas GOP between those who want to hold on to the party’s immediate success and those who want to recalibrate the party’s appeal to broader constituencies, especially a growing number of Hispanic voters.

Fritsch trumpets her conservative credentials. She advocates fiscal restraint, supports the Second Amendment and opposes abortion and gay marriage. She is pro-business and says the proper role of government is to help people succeed, not “recycle people in poverty.”

She got her politics from her mother, who worked three jobs rather than take welfare and who once voted for Ronald Reagan and was thereby excluded from the extended family’s Thanksgiving dinner. “There’s a picture of us with a turkey and ice water,” Fritsch said.

Attorney General Greg Abbott is the favorite for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, a veteran politician with plenty of big-dollar donors and a favorite of the party’s far-right flank. Therein lies the problem, Fritsch says.

While the Democratic Party will have two women at the top of the ticket — Sens. Wendy Davis for governor and Leticia Van de Putte for lieutenant governor — the Texas GOP has become “the party of all these men and the same old recycled candidates,” Fritsch warned.

Fritsch, a married, 38-year-old mother of two who lives with her family in Austin, argues…Continued here: http://www.dallasnews.com/news/columnists/wayne-slater/20131126-gop-candidate-for-texas-governor-touts-her-appeal-to-women-latinos-blacks.ece

Solis begins serving bribery sentence Previous post Solis begins serving bribery sentence Dallas-Fort Worth area reports most whooping cough cases since 2004 Next post Dallas-Fort Worth area reports most whooping cough cases since 2004